eerie1

eerie

1951 Series

Publisher: Avon
Publication Dates: May-June 1951 – August-September 1954
Number of Issues Published: 17 (#1 – #17)
Color: Color
Dimensions: Standard Golden Age U. S.
Paper Stock: Glossy cover; Newsprint interior
Binding: Saddle-Stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Numbering continues with Strange Worlds (Avon, 1950 series) #18

Regular series horror title, after an earlier one-shot experiment, Eerie Comics (Avon, 1947 series); the horrified girl seen on the cover to issue #5 was reworked for the covers to #9, #13 and #17 (image reversed).

1958 Series

Publisher: IW Publisher, Super Comics
Publication Dates: 1958 – 1958
Number of Issues Published: 4 (#1 #8 #9 #15)
Color: Color
Dimensions: Standard Silver Age U. S.
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Eerie was an American magazine of horror comics introduced in 1966 by Warren Publishing. Like Mad, it was a black-and-white magazine intended for newsstand distribution and thus intentionally outside the control of the Comics Code Authority. Each issue’s stories were introduced by the host character, Cousin Eerie. Its sister publications were Creepy and Vampirella.

The first issue, in early 1966, had only a 200-issue run of an “ashcan” edition. With a logo by Ben Oda, it was created overnight by editor Archie Goodwin and letterer Gaspar Saladino to establish publisher Jim Warren’s ownership of the title when it was discovered that a rival publisher (later known as Eerie Publications) would be using the name. Warren explained, “We launched Eerie because we thought Creepy ought to have an adversary. The Laurel and Hardy syndrome always appealed to me. Creepy and Eerie are like Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre.”

Official distribution began with the second issue (March, 1966), priced at 35 cents. Behind the Frank Frazetta cover were graphic horror tales edited by Goodwin and hosted by the lumpish Cousin Eerie, a curious character created by Jack Davis. With scripts by Goodwin, E. Nelson Bridwell and Larry Ivie, the second issue featured art by Gene Colan, Johnny Craig (as Jay Taycee), Reed Crandall, Jerry Grandenetti (uncredited), Gray Morrow, Joe Orlando, John Severin, Angelo Torres and Alex Toth. Other artists during this era included Wally Wood, Al Williamson, Neal Adams, Dan Adkins, and Steve Ditko. Eerie was published on a bi-monthly basis.

Goodwin would eventually resign as the editor of Eerie after issue 11 in September 1967. Due to a lack of funds, the majority of the magazine’s well known artists departed, and Warren was forced to rely on reprints, which would be prevalent in the magazine until issue 26 in March 1970. Editors during this period included Bill Parente and publisher Jim Warren himself. Things would pick up starting in 1969 with the premiere of Vampirella magazine. Some of Eerie’s original artists including Frazetta, Crandall and Wood would return, as would Goodwin, as Associate Editor for issues 29 through 33.

A variety of editors would continue to manage Eerie after Goodwin’s second departure including Billy Graham and J.R. Cochran. William Dubay, who first joined Warren as an artist in 1970, would become editor of the magazine for issues 43 through 72. During this period the frequency of Eerie and Warren’s other magazines was upped to nine issues per year. Color stories would begin appearing in Eerie starting with issue 54 in February 1974.

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UPDATE 20-08-2016

IW 1

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Avon 1-9









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Avon 10-17, IW 8,9,15











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